Impersonal Life: How Instagram Opened Private Accounts - Written are Given
Impersonal Life: How Instagram Opened Private Accounts

Impersonal Life: How Instagram Opened Private Accounts

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Private photos and videos, as well as stories added to Instagram, were not as private as the developers intended. Impersonal Life: How Instagram Opened Private Accounts


Impersonal Life: How Instagram Opened Private Accounts


Private photos and videos, as well as stories added to Instagram, were not as private as the developers intended - Buzzfeed discovered an easy way to not only view closed posts but also share them with everyone. At the same time, Facebook does not consider such a bug to be a problem and, apparently, they are not going to fix it.




“No different from the screenshot”


Instagram photos, videos, and stories posted behind closed doors can be easily viewed and even shared with friends, BuzzFeed reports. At the same time, hacking skills are not required for such an operation - just basic knowledge of the HTML code is enough.
The page code is opened in the browser, the user browses it and finds the URLs associated with a particular snapshot or video. Then the received link can be sent to other people who can see its contents without subscribing to a closed account and even without authorization in Instagram.
As follows from the BuzzFeed experiment, JPEG and MP4 files thus obtained can not only be shared with third parties but also downloaded to your device.
Such a system bypass works even when it comes to private history, the contents of which should be deleted automatically after 24 hours.
At the same time, Facebook claims that this, in the language of programmers, is a "feature, not a bug." According to the administration of the service that owns Instagram, getting the link in this way is no different from taking a screenshot of a private picture, which you can then send to friends as a picture.
“The actions described here are similar to creating a screenshot with a photo of a friend on Facebook and Instagram and transferring it to other people. It does not give people access to another person’s closed account, ”the Facebook press service said.
However, without even having experience in the field of social networks, it is not difficult to notice that there is still a difference between the ability to take a screenshot and the ability to share a link with a private photo.
In addition, as noted by BuzzFeed, Instagram carefully monitors those users who view your content inside the application but definitely do not see those who follow your account using these URLs that can be easily found in the code. In other words, if someone decides to share a link to your private content, you will not know about it - you will not know the name of the person who posted the link, as well as how many people watched it.
Among other things, the presence of a link, unlike a screenshot, confirms the authenticity of a photo or video, since the URL cannot be faked. Also, even remote content is available via the link, making a screenshot of which is basically impossible.
Earlier, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg announced plans to “fix” his social network, focusing on the privacy of the platform.
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“We are responsible for your data, and if we cannot protect it, then we are not worthy to serve you,” Zuckerberg said in an appeal to users in 2018.
Given this promise, as well as the scandal with Cambridge Analytica, there are many questions regarding the failure of management to influence the situation with private links.

Around the fakes

In late August, a fake spread on Instagram, which was caught by foreign stars, thereby triggering a wave of misinformation. At the same time, the platform could not cope in time and limit its distribution.
Julia Roberts, Asher, Taraji Henson, Dave Batista, Julianne Moore, Rob Lowe, Josh Brolin, Adriana Lima and even U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry posted a fake on Instagram that first appeared on the Internet back in 2012. Then a message was posted on Facebook marked “Deadline Tomorrow!”, Calling for a repost of a publication telling about changes in the privacy policy of the company.
The prankers who distributed this message claimed that if you leave a copy on your wall, Facebook will take into account that it is forbidden to use the user's personal data because it forbade it.
This incident clearly showed that a handful of uninformed stars is enough to spread an unsubstantiated conspiracy theory on the Internet - millions of people around the world will learn about it in a few hours. And if in this situation the fake was harmless enough and did not have any effect, do not forget that the content of such a message can be any, and therefore have more serious consequences.

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